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i hate war, but i hate our enemies even more





Heath Schultz arranged the content for this book, creating an unconventional textual object that uses détournement, collage, and experimental writing against reactionary liberalism, capitalism, and white supremacy. The layout and typographic strategies work in total service of a series of ideological juxtapositions, where visual and verbal texts—critical theory, police propaganda, militant cinema, country songs, activist histories, and white reactionary protests—are woven together. Sometimes this reads as a forced, brute collision and other times as a careful, delicate thread across the pages. Translated visuals from popular media can offer clarity in a new context or obscure and detach like a game of telephone. 

George Wallace speaks to Stokely Carmichael in Watts. Radio Raheem hears conservative country music through his boombox while telling the story of Love and Hate. Darren Wilson supporters share the stage with Al Sharpton. Peter Watkins’ Communards sing La Marseillaise and Bill Withers sings Grandma’s Hands in the same set.

In these conjunctions, we find the reproduction of struggle and the potential for short-circuiting the reproduction of white supremacy. This book aims to enact a critical theory of the spectacle as it joins the practical movement of negation within society.

Published in collaboration with Minor Compositions. Official release to the book trade will be September 2019. Order a copy directly from Minor Compositions now, as well as access the free digital download of the book on their site.

64 pages, 5.5" x 8.5". 2019.


/ 2019